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RIRS logo Rose Hit Parade November 2001
 

Welcome to our new column written by members who share descriptions of their favorite roses with us. Members may contribute to this column more than once, since many of us have more than one ‘favorite’ rose.  If you had to choose one rose, though, that performs above all others in your garden, what would it be? Why would you choose it?  Is it because of its fragrance, its color, its disease resistance, its hardiness or its blooms?  In this issue, we have an article about ‘The Perfect Rose.’  While we know that there is no rose that will give us everything we want, save in our mind’s eye, this column will include your ideas of roses that have qualities that make them, in your opinion, members of our own Rhode Island Rose Society Rose Hit Parade. – Editor 

 

 ‘Crimson Glory’ – Ed Cunningham

Beauty is in the eye, and nose, of the beholder; it varies from person to person.  Thus, I can merely write the truth humbly, according to how I have experienced it: ‘CRIMSON GLORY’ RULES!!!  The fragrance of a rose is experienced only when in close proximity to it, while the beauty of a rose is apparent across the room, or across the yard.  Nonetheless, I get my greatest and most intense pleasure from a rose from its fragrance.  My favorite rose fragrance is clove, a fragrance I do not find to be very common; when it does appear, it is usually mild, or in a formless Rugosa type rose.   My second favorite scent is damask.   On good days, ‘Crimson Glory’ is drenched in it.   Early in my fascination with roses, I was wandering a large rose nursery, viewing and smelling the roses.  When I stood up from smelling a good specimen of ‘Crimson Glory’, I must have had a blissful look on my face, since a nursery worker said, “better than drugs, huh?” 

‘Crimson Glory’ does not have the “classic, high-centered, urn-shape” common among Queens of Show.  In my humble opinion, it has a better, more interesting shape, and certainly has prettier and more interesting petals.  Rather than an opening spiral, its shape is closer to an OGR’s, with the petals turning in toward the center, a bit reminiscent of a cabbage rose, but with more twisting and turning of the petals.  As the petals turn over toward the center, they reveal an intense, rich, almost satiny-succulent reverse.  The front of the petals are the deepest dark red velvet you’d want, with much of the petals appearing as black velvet  (photographs never do this justice).   Sometimes, the outer petals reflex backwards, while the rest of the petals form a cup.  Even when fully open, the incurved petals only reveal a few of their striking golden-yellow stamens (Georgia O’Keefe would have loved it).  ‘Crimson Glory’ blooms freely, and is winter hardy here.  Its only defects are low vigor, and a susceptibility to blackspot.  Even so, as long as they make Daconil, if I could only have one rose, ‘Crimson Glory’ would definitely be it.

P.S.  a few years ago, Sam McGredy IV wrote in the rec.gardens.roses newsgroup that when he was young, ‘Crimson Glory’ was the rose that kindled his love of roses.

 

 

 ‘Paradise’ - Stephanie Henderson

Paradise’ is the “Energizer Bunny” of my rose garden.  It keeps bloomin’ and bloomin’ and bloomin . . .’  and what blooms they are!  Full  petaled  lavender

blooms darken to near amethyst at the edges.  The more intense the sun, the more intense the color.  The sweetly scented blooms are borne singly or in small clusters on a tall, vigorous, upright plant.  Foliage is glassy, dark green.  Disease resistance is outstanding.  I have seen no mildew and even in a bad year, very little blackspot.  While Botanica states that die-back is common in colder climates, my plants have suffered very little dieback over the past three winters.  This season I acquired one plant of ‘Barbra Streisand’ and planted it next to my three of ‘Paradise.’ No comparison!  While they are of the same color class, the flowers of ‘Paradise’ are much more intense in color and more profuse.  I found ‘Barbra Streisand’ to be a stingy bloomer with slow repeat.  If you are looking for a mauve rose, I would highly recommend ‘Paradise’.

 

 ‘Country Cottage’- Bob Vitale

‘Country Cottage’, part of the "Country" family is a vigorous climber which we have on an eight foot pillar. It has lush, green foliage, has been totally disease-free since we planted it three years ago and constantly blooms with three inch flowers which are light peach in color. It has a slight fragrance and at the end of the season it produces large red hips which the birds love. It does attract Japanese Beetles. When Art Emmons, who judged our last rose show, was here he commented on it and wanted to know what this most impressive rose was.

 

 

--- Want to contribute to this column? RIRS members send your Hit Parade choice, with a one or two paragraph description, to me, Angie Chute:  APC1090@aol.com

 

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