RHODE ISLAND

ROSE SOCIETY
                                     
                                     

"Canadian" Roses, Eh ?

Ed Cunningham

  As I sit here writing this article, it is early January; the temperature outside is due to approach 0 F degrees tonight. I begin to wonder which of my roses will not survive. Then, my daughter called; she is in Toronto. She informs me that it is due to go down to -11 F there tonight. And then, I begin to marvel that some folks in Canada were able to breed roses that are hardy, without protection, in Canadian winters ! Heck, any place you can mention in Canada is directly NORTH of the USA. ( In rosarian, "North" is a polite euphemism for "colder than").

Maine has zones 5 thru 3

Michigan has zones 5 thru 3

No. Dakota has zones 4 thru 3

Minnesota has zones 4 thru 3

Griffith Buck grew his roses in Ames, Iowa, at the border of zones 5a - 4b

And Canadians have bred roses that are hardy in zones that are, uh, "north" of those states !

HOW’D they DO that ? (Are they, uh, "petroleum based" roses ?)

No ! But, Canadian rose breeding nurseries are essentially "China-rose-free & Tea-rose-free" zones. Their breeders utilized hardy, native Canadian roses, and, like Dr. Walter Brownell, also employed hardy roses from other continents.

There are two major sources of Canadian roses. Morden, Manitoba, in the Canadian plains, and Ontario, in the east of Canada.

In the 1940's, the Morden agricultural station produced their first "flush" of cultivars, bred largely from native prairie roses, especially Rosa Arkansas. This was their "Prairie" series, and included Prairie Dawn, Prairie Maid, and the first Canadian repeat bloomer, Prairie Youth (10). Later on, additions were made to the genetic base of the program; "for example, Dr. Buck's 'Prairie Princess' (a cultivar with both Rosa laxa and Rosa spinossisima in its background) was used extensively (10)."

More recently, a new generation of Morden roses has arisen, the "Parkland" series of roses. These were also bred in Manitoba, largely by Colicutt and Marshall, for prairie conditions (1,2). Many of their modern releases have included "Morden" in their name. Their blooms are in the red, pink, white range, and are generally "formless." Their only yellow is Morden Sunrise, released in 2000. They are hardy to zone 3 (1) (2). At the Morden Research Centre, guided tours of the grounds or buildings are available for large groups only, and with prior arrangements made by contacting the Centre at (204) 822_4471.

The other, and larger, source was the "Explorer" series which began in Ontario, eastern Canada, in 1961. The predominant breeder was Dr. Felicitas Svejda. She tended to employ primarily rugosa or Kordesii parents, rather than the native prairie roses. As government support for rose breeding receded, this program was moved to l'Assomption, in the province of Quebec (8), for its final years in the 1990's. These Explorer roses "require little pruning and minimum winter protection, other than a good snow cover. Also, these roses are noted for good disease resistance" (2). These roses were named after early Canadian explorers who had survived harsh Canadian winters, and are also mainly red, pink, white and "formless." Some Red Explorer roses are: Alexander Mackenzie, Champlain and Charles Albanel, Pink Explorers include Jens Munk and William Baffin, and Henry Hudson is a white cultivar'' (4).

Depending on whom you listen to, you will hear that one series or the other is the better rose. But, reports seem to predominantly show that the Explorers are the hardier and more disease resistant series. However, the University of Missouri does report that recent introductions such as 'Morden Snowbeauty' and 'Morden Sunrise' display significantly improved resistance to blackspot (11).

Both the Parkland and the Explorer roses root easily from cuttings and should be grown on their own roots. In fact, 'Parkland' roses budded or grafted on rootstocks have not performed well at Morden while "own root" plants seem to have a long and productive life (10).

The University of Minnesota has a wonderful web-site titled: "Selecting Hardy Roses for Northern Climates" at http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/DG6750.html. It displays a chart which provides many cultivars: Names; Class; Color; Bloom Repeat; Size; General Shape of the rose plant; Hardiness Zones; and Comments on disease resistance, etc.

The Canadian Rose Society also presents a (bi-lingual) chart of Canadian roses at http://www.mirror.org/groups/crs/index.html.

 

Another very informative site on "cold hardy" (but not Canadian) roses is http://home.earthlink.net/~passepartout/griffithbuck.htm. It reports observations from a three_year University of Minnesota (USDA zone 4a) trial of Buck roses which were not sprayed or winter protected.

 

Help-Me-Find.com, as usual, provides lists and information on all the Explorer and Parkland/Morden roses

A very interesting narrative history of Canadian roses may be found at www.mirror.org/groups/crs/efreeman.html

While it is unfortunate that the Canadian government chose to cease support for the Explorer program, not all is lost. "... there are still many interesting seedlings from the program that have not been fully tested or released. In order not to lose them completely, Agriculture Canada has now embarked on a joint venture with the nursery trade in the private sector. Together they are working on producing a series of roses that will be named after Canadian artists. They have taken the best material left from the Explorer program, and incorporated new material into it, in the hope of producing roses that are hardy, but also have other characteristics that the nurserymen feel will make them marketable. This program is centered at the Research Station at Saint_Jean_sur_Richelieu, Quebec under the direction of Madame Claude Richer, and at the Morden Research Station under Dr. Campbell Davidson. The first crosses were made in 1998 and field testing and evaluations are being done by the partner nurseries. No resulting roses are expected until 2003 or 2005" (10).

After this winter, "O ! Canada ! eh ?

 

(1) www.twincitiesrose.org/roseofmonth.html

(2) www.kountry.ca/roses.htm

(4) www.farmca.com/news/mayjune2000/roses.html

(8) http://pss.uvm.edu/ppp/quiz0804.htm

(10) www.mirror.org/groups/crs/efreeman.html

(11) http://muextension.missouri.edu/xplor/agguides/hort/g06600.htm

 

 

 

 

 

 

WONDERFUL website of hardy roses chart/characteristics at U. of Minnesota extension service:

http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/DG6750.html

(Selecting Hardy Roses for Northern Climates)

Cultivar names; Class; Color; Bloom Repeat; Size; General Shape of the rose plant; Hardiness Zones; and comments on disease resisitance, etc.

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from http://home.earthlink.net/~passepartout/griffithbuck.htm

Below are some observations from a three_year Buck rose trial at the University of Minnesota (USDA zone 4a). These roses were not sprayed or winter protected.

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(3) from: http://home.earthlink.net/~passepartout/griffithbuck.htm

If Iowa State didn't appreciate Buck's roses, other breeders certainly did. Both the Meillands of France and Agriculture Canada used Buck's roses in their own hybridizing programs: the first, for flowering landscape roses, the latter for the hardy Explorer series. Today Griffith Buck's roses and their descendents thrive in America's gardens.

 

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fromhttp://www.rosefile.com/TheTables/xBuck.html

In a parallel program in Canada a series of 'Morden' roses were bred by Colicutt and Marshall; Morden Ruby, Morden Centennial, Morden Fireglow, Morden Ruby etc.

 

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(1) from:tin cities rose club

http://www.twincitiesrose.org/roseofmonth.html

Rose of the Month ~ January 2004

Morden Sunrise

This month's selection is a little different from our previous selections. It is a rose that is new enough to not yet be rated by the ARS. I saw these two beautiful plants in TCRC member gardens and thought it would be an interesting poll to see what luck other growers were having with this new rose. Morden Sunrise is a the only yellow rose in the Morden/Parkland series of roses which were bred in Manitoba by Colicutt and Marshall. It was introduced in 2000. The blooms are 3 inches with 8+ petals in a blend of yellows, corals and oranges. The bush will grow around 3 feet tall and wide with shiny green foliage. Like other Morden roses it is rated as hardy to Zone 3. The jury is still out on disease resistance_will it be more like Morden Centennial with little to no disease or prone to mildew and blackspot like Morden Blush?

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(2) from Kountry Klassics in Canada

http://www.kountry.ca/roses.htm

Parkland Series

The Parkland Series roses are Canadian roses that were developed in Morden, Manitoba, and were bred specifically for prairie conditions.

Explorer Series

The Explorer rose series has the world's most successful breeding program for winter_hardy roses. They require little pruning and minimum winter protection, other than a good snow cover. Also, these roses are noted for good disease resistance.

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(4) from http://www.farmca.com/news/mayjune2000/roses.html In Alberta

''Canadian plant breeders have been busy developing new hardy roses,'' adds Barkley. ''The Explorer series was developed in Ontario using hardy parent stock to produce hardy offspring. Disease resistance was also bred into these plants. Roses in the Explorer series are named after the early Canadian Explorers. Some Red Explorer roses are: Alexander Mackenzie, Champlain and Charles Albanel, Pink Explorers include Jens Munk and William Baffin, and Henry Hudson is a white cultivar.''

The Agriculture Canada Research Station at Morden, Manitoba, has developed the Parkland series. These roses have a native prairie rose as a parent. Adelaide Hoodless, Cuthbert Grant, Morden Fireglow and Morden Amorette are red Parkland roses. Pink ones include Morden Blush and Morden Centennial.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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from: the town of Morden website

http://www.mordenmb.com/research.html

Morden Research Centre

The Department of Agriculture in 1915 established the Research Centre, thanks, in part, to the horticultural work previously done by pioneer A.P. Stevenson. It was originally started as an experimental farm to conduct research and demonstrate to farmers better methods of growing their crops and the use of trees and shrubs to beautify and protect their land. The location was selected because of our long growing season, notably the greatest number of frost free days on the prairies.

 

Aside from research, the Morden Research Centre also offers a scenic retreat for picnics, pictures, or a leisurely walk through the various plantations. Optimum visiting time is May through September. Guided tours of the grounds or buildings are available for large groups only and with prior arrangements made by contacting the Centre at (204) 822_4471.

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(5) "LOST Citation"

The Parkland series is a set of rose varieties specially developed to survive the Canadian winters by Agriculture and Agri_Food Canada (AAFC) at Morden Research Station in Manitoba. They are exceptional for their hardiness in Canada. They require minimal care and are environmentally friendly, needing minimal sprays. They are hardy down to _35 C with only snow as protection, are disease resistant, flower repeatedly throughout the summer, require only minimal pruning and come in a variety of colours and sizes. See also their Explorer Series.

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(6) from http://www3.sympatico.ca/galetta/tables/explorerroses.html

 

Explorer Roses

 

Very hardy roses, many with exceptional flowering habits. All are named after famous (and not so famous!) Canadian explorers. These roses were originally developed at the Ottawa research station, with new varieties being introduced from the research station in l'Assomption PQ,. Explorer roses need very little winter protection. Your tax dollars at work, and worth every penny!

************************************************************************************(7) from http://www.vandycks.com/roses/z33159.350176.phtml

Explorers

Some of these are almost entirely from Rugosa parentage while others were bred from the cold_hardy Kordesii roses hybridized in the late 1940's in Germany.

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(8) From http://pss.uvm.edu/ppp/quiz0804.htm

Canadian Explorer Roses

This series was developed in the 1960s through 1990s in Canada, first at the Ottawa research station and latter from the research station in l'Assomption PQ. They were bred to withstand cold northern winters, with most from rugosa or Kordesii parents (latter bred in Germany in the late 1940s), and featuring many reds. They were named after famous, and not so famous, Canadian explorers. How well do you know the following selections from this series of 22 or so, and these Canadians? Match the name with the description. Answers are at the bottom.

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(8-B) from.. http://pss.uvm.edu/ppp/articles/hardroses.htm

U of Vermont Extension

Parkland roses have not been reliable or have not survived, with the better of the group for us being Cuthbert Grant (wine red) and Prairie Dawn (pink).

The Explorer series has performed the best, with most cultivars tested, and the only one not reliably surviving being Champlain. Of the Explorer series, we saw the best results with Charles Albanel (pink), David Thompson (pink), and Henry Hudson (white).

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(11) from http://muextension.missouri.edu/xplor/agguides/hort/g06600.htm

Parkland

Canadian rose breeders developed the Parkland series of roses for their ability to do well under extreme winter cold and drought conditions. The most popular of the Parkland series are the Morden shrub roses, including 'Morden Blush', 'Morden Centennial' and 'Morden Fireglow'. They produce beautiful hybrid_tea_like blooms throughout the season, and the shrub has a compact growth habit with attractive glossy foliage. 'Cuthbert Grant' combines hardiness with perhaps the best flower quality in a shrub rose. Although Parkland roses have traditionally had problems with blackspot in Missouri, recent introductions such as 'Morden Snowbeauty' and 'Morden Sunrise' display significantly improved resistance to blackspot.

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(10) From http://www.mirror.org/groups/crs/efreeman.html

Due to budget cutbacks, the Canadian government has terminated the Explorer program, but there are still many interesting seedlings from the program that have not been fully tested or released. In order not to lose them completely, Agriculture Canada has now embarked on a joint venture with the nursery trade in the private sector. Together they are working on producing a series of roses that will be named after Canadian artists. They have taken the best material left from the Explorer program and incorporated new material into it in the hope of producing roses that are hardy, but also have other characteristics that the nurserymen feel will make them marketable. This program is centered at the Research Station at Saint_Jean_sur_Richelieu, Quebec under the direction of Madame Claude Richer and at the Morden Research Station under Dr. Campbell Davidson. The first crosses were made in 1998 and field testing and evaluations are being done by the partner nurseries. No resulting roses are expected until 2003 or 2005.

On a brighter note, the other, parallel track of government rose breeding in Canada is continuing. Established in 1915, the Morden Research Centre on the Prairies has become the major centre for both crop and ornamental plant breeding for western Canada. In the 1940's, they released a number of hardy non_repeat blooming roses as part of the "Prairie" series. These were further developed to produce the repeat blooming 'Prairie Youth'(1948), one of the first continuous blooming Shrub roses hardy in the plains region of Canada without winter protection.

As the Parkland breeding program progressed, a variety of cultivars and species in addition to R. arkansana were used to broaden the genetic base of the program as well as incorporate new floral, vegetative and other characteristics. For example, Dr. Buck's 'Prairie Princess' (a cultivar with both Rosa laxa and Rosa spinossisima in its background) was used extensively.

The Explorer roses seem to be better known than the Parkland roses. But, in my experience, the Parkland roses are generally more reliably hardy than some of the Explorers.

Both the Parkland and the Explorer roses root easily from cuttings and should be grown on their own roots. In fact, 'Parkland' roses budded or grafted on rootstocks have not performed well at Morden while "own root" plants seem to have a long and productive life.

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From Galetta Nurseries near Ottawa in Canada, very good charts re. Parkland/morden (Manitoba) & explorer (Ottawa) roses

http://www3.sympatico.ca/galetta/tables/parklandroses.html

Another exceptional series of hardy Canadian roses, developed by the Morden Research Station in southern Manitoba. All are very hardy, and many have some really exceptional blooms.

 

Is it in stock?

We usually have the varieties listed below in stock, but availability can vary year to year. Please contact us to see if a specific item is in stock.

We sell only from our retail location in Galetta, Ontario: we cannot ship any plants.

 

Species Latin Description Width Height Zone

Adelaide Hoodless Rosa x ‘Adelaide Hoodless’ (1973) Bright red, slightly fragrant, semi_double flowers are borne in large clusters of up to 25 all summer and fall. Red rosehips in the fall. Dark, glossy green foliage is disease resistant.

This rose was named after Adelaide Hoodless, the founder of the Women’s Institute. 5_6’ 5_6’ 2

Cuthbert Grant Rosa x ‘Cuthbert Grant’ (1967) Large, semi_double, velvety, dark crimson flowers have a light fragrance and are borne in clusters of three to six repeatedly throughout the summer. Glossy foliage on an upright, vigorous shrub has excellent resistance to blackspot and powdery mildew. 3_4’ 3_4’ 3

Hope for Humanity Rosa x ‘Hope for Humanity’ Intense, dark red, double flowers are as close to a true "blood red" colour as you can get. A low_growing everblooming rose.

Developed by the Morden, Manitoba research station for the 100th Anniversary of the Canadian Red Cross. 2 _ 3’ 2 _ 4’ 3b

Morden Amorette Rosa x ‘Morden Amorette’ (1977) Fully doubled and lightly fragrant carmine_red flowers are everblooming on this compact, semi_dwarf shrub. A good number of red rosehips are produced in fall and persist through the winter. Good resistance to powdery mildew and rust. Ideal for growing in patio pots.

1_2’ 1_2’ 3

Morden Blush Rosa x ‘Morden Blush’ (1988) Fully double, softly scented ivory flowers open with a blush centre which gradually fades to a soft ivory. Blooms continuously and profusely from June to frost with up to five flowers per cluster. Dark green leaves have good resistance to both powdery mildew and blackspot. With great heat and drought tolerance once established, it survives the toughest locations. 2_3’ 2_3’ 2

Morden Cardinette Rosa x ‘Morden Cardinette’ (1980) Large, double, cardinal red flowers adorn this dwarf shrub either singly or in clusters of up to five or sometimes larger. The cupped, lightly fragrant flowers bloom continuously all summer. The medium green leaves are highly resistant to rust. Makes an excellent patio pot rose, but don’t forget to plant it in the garden in the fall!

2 _ 2.5’ 2 _ 2.5’ 3

Morden Centennial Rosa x ‘Morden Centennial’ (1980) Large, double, medium pink flowers have a light sweet scent and appear alone or in clusters of up to 15. Flowers repeatedly throughout the summer. Red rosehips are produced in the fall and persist throughout the winter. Good resistance to powdery mildew and rust. Prune back in early spring for a bushier plant and more flowers. 3_4’ 4_5’ 2

Morden Fireglow Rosa x ‘Morden Fireglow’ (1989) These unusually coloured, lightly fragrant, double flowers are orange_red on the insides and flaming scarlet on the undersides. Blooms repeatedly from early summer to frost on an upright bushy plant which resembles a hybrid tea rose. Dark green foliage is resistant to powdery mildew and rust.

2 _ 3’ 3 _ 3.5’ 3

Morden Ruby Rosa x ‘Morden Ruby’ (1977) These flowers are a dark, ruby_red freckled with splashes of a deeper red. Masses of long_lasting flowers cover this vigorous shrub. A repeat bloomer that blooms most profusely in early and late summer. This rose is a relative of Adelaide Hoodless but has improved resistance to blackspot and mildew. 3 _ 3.5’ 3 _ 3.5’ 3

Morden Snow Beauty Rosa x ‘Morden Snowbeauty’ (1999) Clusters of lightly fragrant, semi_double white flowers bloom continuously amid shiny, dark green foliage. This low_growing shrub is highly resistant to blackspot and powdery mildew. 3.5’ 2.5’ 3

Morden Sunrise Rosa x ‘Morden Sunrise’ (2000) A brand_new introduction from the Morden Research Station in Manitoba...and the only yellow rose in the Parkland series. Very limited quantities. 4' 4' 3

Prairie Dawn Rosa x ‘Prairie Dawn’ (1959) Glowing, medium pink, double flowers are produced all season long on an upright shrub. Dark, glossy green foliage. Prairie hardy! 4.5 _ 5’ 4.5 _ 5’ 3

Prairie Joy Rosa x ‘Prairie Joy’ (1990) Medium pink, double flowers appear in clusters continuously throughout the summer. This dense shrub has an arching form and makes an excellent hedge. Very resistant to rust, powdery mildew, and black spot.

For a dense rose hedge, this is the perfect plant: cut back to 6"_12" each year until the hedge is established. 4’ 4.5’ 2

Rheinaupark Rosa x ‘Rheinaupark’ (1983) Medium to dark red, double flowers on beautiful, glossy dark green leaves. Unusual wrinkled leaves and thorny stems. Slightly fragrant. Extremely hardy. 4’ 6’ 4

Winnipeg Parks Rosa x ‘Winnipeg Parks’ (1991) Large, double flowers open cherry_red and then fade to dark pinkish_red with dark pink on the undersides. Blooms continuously in lightly fragrant clusters on a low, dense bush. Good resistance to powdery mildew and rust. In cool weather and in fall, the foliage develops a reddish tinge. Extremely hardy. 2’ 2’ 3

 

 

 

 

 

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From HELP-ME-FIND

MORDEN ROSES

Morden 6910

Morden Amorette

Morden Blush Shrub.

Seed: Prairie Princess x Morden Amorette

Pollen: [ [ R. arkansana x Assiniboine ] x White Bouquet ] x Prairie Princess

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1988) by L.M. Collicutt.

Bloom: (looks like a cross between Stanwell Perpetual & Mme. Hardy !)

Light pink [ARS lp] blooms. Mild fragrance. 52 petals. Average diameter 2.75". Double, medium bloom form. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 2½' to 4' . Width of 19¾".

Growing: Zone 4 thru 9. Disease susceptibility: Disease resistant.

In September 1998, the Montreal Botanical Garden (Le Jardin Botanique de Montreal) carried out a survey of its roses' resistance to black spot, powdery mildew and rust. This is one of the outstanding varieties which showed a 0% to 5% infection rate.

Morden Cardinette

Morden Centennial

Seed: Prairie Princess

Pollen: White Bouquet x [ x Assiniboine ]

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1980) by H.H. Marshall.

Bloom: (blowsy) Medium pink [ARS mp] blooms. Mild fragrance. Double, large bloom form. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 5' . Width of 6' .

Growing: Zone 3 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Disease resistant.

Notes: In September 1998, the Montreal Botanical Garden (Le Jardin Botanique de Montreal) carried out a survey of its roses' resistance to black spot, powdery mildew and rust. This is one of the outstanding varieties which showed a 0% to 5% infection rate.

Morden Fireglow

Parentage: Seedling_Sämling x Morden Cardinette

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1989) by L.M. Collicutt.

Bloom: (very Blowsy) Orange_red & orange_red blend blooms. Mild fragrance. Semi_double bloom form. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 2' to 4' . Width of 2' to 3' .

Growing: Zone 3 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Blackspot (see FAQ).

Notes: Royall River Roses says this rose has loosely cupped, 2_3" fiery orange_red blossoms in sprays of 1 to 5... Large, globular hips in the fall...

More Info: complete descendant list: 1 only.

 

 

Morden Ruby

Morden Snow Beauty

Morden Sunrise

 

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Breeder / Hybridizer

Morden Exp. Farm

NOTES ROSES BRED

F,L Prairie Charm

C,F,G,L,N,P,T Prairie Dawn

C,F,G,L,N Prairie Maid

F,T Prairie Sailor

F,L Prairie Wren

F,G,L,N Prairie Youth

 

A: AWARDS

C: COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS

F: REFERENCES

G: GARDENS

L: LINEAGE

N: NURSERIES

P: PHOTOS

T: NOTES

 

 

William Baffin

Class: Explorer, Hybrid Kordesii, Kordesii.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1983) by Dr. Felicitas Svejda.

 

 

Morden Amorette

Class: Parkland, Shrub.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1977) by H.H. Marshall.

Bloom: Deep pink [ARS dp] blooms. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Growing: Zone 3 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Disease resistant.

Parentage:

Seed: Independence x [ x R. arkansana ]

Pollen: Fire King (Floribunda, Meilland, 1959) x [ x Assiniboine ]

 

 

 

Morden Blush

Class: Parkland, Shrub.

aka: Blush (syn. 'Morden Blush')

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1988) by L.M. Collicutt.

Bloom: Light pink [ARS lp] blooms. Mild fragrance. 52 petals. Average diameter 2.75". Medium, double bloom form. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 2½' to 4' . Width of 19¾".

Growing: Zone 4 thru 9. Disease susceptibility: Disease resistant.

Parentage:

Seed: Prairie Princess x Morden Amorette

Pollen: [ [ R. arkansana x Assiniboine ] x White Bouquet ] x Prairie Princess

 

Morden Cardinette

Class: Parkland, Shrub.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1980) by H.H. Marshall.

Bloom: Medium red [ARS mr] blooms. Mild fragrance. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Growing: Zone 3 and higher.

Parentage:

Seed: Prairie Princess x [ White Bouquet x [ J.W. Fargo x Assiniboine ] ]

Pollen: Adelaide Hoodless x [ Independence x [ Donald Prior x R. arkansana ] ]

 

Morden Centennial

Class: Parkland, Shrub.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1980) by H.H. Marshall.

Bloom: Medium pink [ARS mp] blooms. Mild fragrance. Large, double bloom form.

Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 5' . Width of 6' .

Growing: Zone 3 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Disease resistant.

Parentage:

Seed: Prairie Princess

Pollen: White Bouquet x [ x Assiniboine ]

 

Morden Fireglow

Class: Parkland, Shrub.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1989) by L.M. Collicutt.

Bloom: Orange_red & orange_red blend blooms. Mild fragrance. Semi_double bloom form. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 2' to 4' . Width of 2' to 3' .

Growing: Zone 3 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Blackspot (see FAQ).

Parentage:

Parentage: Seedling x Morden Cardinette

 

 

Morden Ruby

Class: Parkland, Shrub.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1977) by H.H. Marshall.

Bloom: Pink blend [ARS pb] blooms. Mild fragrance. Double bloom form. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 3' to 4' . Width of up to 4' .

Growing: Zone 3 and higher.

Parentage:

Seed: Fire King (Floribunda, Meilland, 1959)

Pollen: J.W. Fargo x Assiniboine

 

Morden Snow Beauty

Class: Parkland, Shrub.

aka: Morden Snowbeauty

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1998) by Davidson & Collicutt.

Bloom: White, near white & white blend [w] blooms. Mild fragrance.

Size: Height of 2¾' to 3' . Width of 4' .

Growing: Zone 2 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Disease resistant.

Parentage:

Seed: Prairie Princess x Morden Amorette

Pollen: Mount Shasta x [ x R. arkansana ]

 

Morden Sunrise

Class: Parkland.

Bloom: Yellow blend [ARS yb] blooms. Strong fragrance. Semi_double bloom form. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 3' .

Growing: Zone 3 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Disease resistant.

Parentage: ?????

 

Winnipeg Parks

Class: Modern Shrub, Parkland, Shrub.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1981) by L.M. Collicutt.

Bloom: Deep pink [ARS dp] blooms. Mild, Tea fragrance. 22 petals. Medium, cupped, double bloom form. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 2½' .

Growing: Zone 3 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Disease resistant.

Parentage:

Seed: Prairie Princess x Cuthbert Grant

Pollen: Seedling x Morden Cardinette

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hope for Humanity

Class: Parkland, Shrub.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1995) by Agriculture and Agri_Food CA.

Bloom: Dark red [ARS dr] blooms. Mild fragrance. 15 to 25 petals. Average diameter 1.5". Medium, double bloom form. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 22" to 5' . Width of up to 2' .

Growing: Zone 4 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Moderately disease_resistant.

Parentage:

Seed: Prairie Princess x Morden Amorette

Pollen: Morden Cardinette x K1

 

 

Adelaide Hoodless

Class: Parkland, Shrub.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1975) by H.H. Marshall. Introduced in Canada by Canadian Ornamental Plant Foundation.

Bloom: Deep pink [ARS dp] blooms. Mild fragrance. Average diameter 3". Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 5' to 6' . Width of 5' to 6' .

Growing: Zone 2 thru 9. Disease susceptibility: Blackspot (see FAQ), Disease resistant.

Parentage:

Seed: Fire King (Floribunda, Meilland, 1959)

Pollen: J.W. Fargo x Assiniboine

 

J.P. Connell

Class: Parkland, Shrub.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1987) by Dr. Felicitas Svejda.

Bloom: Medium yellow [ARS my] blooms. Strong fragrance. 50 petals. Double bloom form. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 5' . Width of 4' .

Growing: Zone 3 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Blackspot (see FAQ).

Parentage:

Parentage: Arthur Bell x Von Scharnhorst

 

 

Champlain

Class: Explorer, Hybrid Kordesii, Kordesii.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1982) by Dr. Felicitas Svejda.

Bloom: Dark red [ARS dr], Scarlet blooms. Mild fragrance. 30 petals. Semi_double bloom form. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 3' to 4' . Width of 3' to 4' .

Growing: Zone 3 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Generally disease_resistant but can mildew.

Parentage:

Seed: R. kordesii x Seedling

Pollen: Red Dawn x Suzanne

 

Henry Kelsey

Class: Explorer, Kordesii, Large_flowered Climber, Shrub.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1984) by Dr. Felicitas Svejda.

Bloom: Medium red [ARS mr] blooms. Spicy fragrance. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 4' to 9' 10". Width of 5' .

Growing: Zone 3 and higher. Shade Tolerant. Disease susceptibility: Generally disease_resistant but can get blackspot.

Parentage:

Parentage: Hybrid of R. kordesii x Seedling

 

John Cabot

Class: Explorer, Hybrid Kordesii, Hybrid Rugosa, Kordesii.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1978) by Dr. Felicitas Svejda.

Bloom: Medium red [ARS mr] blooms. Mild fragrance. 40 petals. Average diameter 2.5". Large, semi_double bloom form. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 5' to 8' . Width of 4' .

Growing: Zone 3 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Disease resistant.

Parentage:

Parentage: Seedling of R. kordesii

 

John Davis

Class: Explorer, Hybrid Kordesii, Kordesii.

Breeding: Bred in Canada (1986) by Dr. Felicitas Svejda.

Bloom: Medium pink [ARS mp] blooms. Spicy fragrance. 40 petals. Average diameter 3.5". Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 7' .

Growing: Zone 3 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Disease resistant.

Parentage:

Seed: R. kordesii x Seedling

Pollen: Seedling

 

 

Louis Jolliet

Class: Explorer, Kordesii.

Breeding: Bred (1990).

Bloom: Medium pink [ARS mp] blooms. Spicy fragrance. Average diameter 3". Double bloom form. Repeats its bloom again later in the season.

Size: Height of 4' to 5' . Width of 4' .

Growing: Zone 3 and higher. Disease susceptibility: Disease resistant.

Parentage:

Parentage: R. kordesii x Seedling

 

 

 

 

 

 

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From Help-Me-Find

 

EXPLORER ROSES

 

C,F,G,L,N,P,T A. Mackenzie

F,G,L,N,P,T AC de Montarville

F,G,L,N,P,T AC Marie_Victorin

C,G,L,N,P,T AC William Booth

C,F,G,L,N,P,T Alex MacKenzie

C,F,G,L,N,P,T Alexander MacKenzie

C

F,G,L,N,T Captain Samuel Holland

A,C,F,G,L,N,P,T Champlain

A,F,G,L,N,P,T Charles Albanel

D

C,F,G,L,N David Thompson

F,G,L,N,P,T De Montarville

N DeMontarville

F

F,G,L,N,P,T Frontenac

 

G

F,G,N,P,T George Vancouver

 

H

A,F,G,L,N,P,T Henry Hudson

A,C,F,G,L,N,P,T Henry Kelsey

 

J

C,F,G,L,N,P,T J.F. Quadra

A,C,F,G,L,N,P,T Jens Munk

A,C,F,G,L,N,P,T John Cabot

A,C,F,G,L,N,P John Davis

C,F,G,L,N,P John Franklin

 

 

 

 

L

C,G,L,N,P,T Lambert Closse

G,L,N,P,T Louis Jolliet

 

M

F,G,L,N,P,T Marie Victorin

F,G,L,N,P,T Marie_Victorin

A,C,F,G,L,N,P,T Martin Frobisher

 

 

N

G,N Nicolas

 

Q

C,F,G,L,N,P,T Quadra

 

R

G,L,N,P Royal Edward

 

S

C,G,L,N,T Simon Fraser

 

W

A,C,F,G,L,N,P,T William Baffin

C,G,L,N,P,T William Booth

 

A: AWARDS

C: COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS

F: REFERENCES

G: GARDENS

L: LINEAGE

N: NURSERIES

P: PHOTOS

T: NOTES

 

***********************************************************************************************

 

 

 

 

PARKLAND ROSES

A

C,F,G,L,N,P,T Adelaide Hoodless

 

B

C,F,G,L,N,P,T Blush (syn. 'Morden Blush')

 

C

C,F,G,L,N,P,T Cuthbert Grant

 

H

C,F,G,L,N,P,T Hope for Humanity

 

J

C,F,G,L,N,P J.P. Connell

 

M

F,G,L,N,P,T Morden Amorette

C,F,G,L,N,P,T Morden Blush

F,G,L,N,P Morden Cardinette

C,F,G,L,N,P,T Morden Centennial

F,G,L,N,P,T Morden Fireglow

A,F,G,L,N Morden Ruby

C,G,L,N,P,T Morden Snow Beauty

C,G,N,P,T Morden Sunrise

 

P

C,F,G,L,N,P,T Prairie Dawn

A,F,G,L,N,P,T Prairie Joy

 

W

A,C,F,G,L,N,P,T Winnipeg Parks

 

A: AWARDS

C: COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS

F: REFERENCES

G: GARDENS

L: LINEAGE

N: NURSERIES

P: PHOTOS

T: NOTES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

***********************************************************************************************

from http://home.earthlink.net/~passepartout/griffithbuck.htm

Below are some observations from a three_year Buck rose trial at the University of Minnesota (USDA zone 4a). These roses were not sprayed or winter protected.

 

'Allamand Ho' Tender in zone 4; needs protection.

'Amiga Mia' Not one of the hardier Bucks.

'Applejack' Hardiest of the Buck race. Not as free flowering as other Bucks.

'April Moon' Highly recommended.

'Aunt Honey' Large leaflets and big flowers. Highly recommended. Some BS in fall.

'Autumn Dusk' Not hardy.

'Barn Dance' Floriferous

'Blue Skies' A Hybrid Tea. Too tender in zone 4.

'Brook Song' Not too hardy, not recommended for MN.

'Carefree Beauty' No BS, some mildew. Tough.

'Chorale' Good scent. Big hips. Very susceptible to BS.

'Country Dancer' Small plant. Good disease resistance. Elegant flowers.

'Country Song' Little plant. Austin parent. Big blooms. Questionable hardiness.

'Countryman' Deep pink, elegant. Three feet tall in MN.

'Distant Drums' Named for Jim Reeves Sixties song. beautiful deep green leaves. Not hardy at all, but worth growing if you can protect it in zone four.

'Dorcas' Flowers are stippled.

'Do_Si_Do' Big leaflets, too tender.

'Earth Song' Floriferous. Beautiful, upright plant, one of Bucks best. Five inch flowers.

'El Catala' Spanish for 'the guy from Catalan' (Spain), Pedro Dot. Small plant in MN, to two feet high.

'Ellen's Joy' Peach colors, stunning, to three feet. healthy.

'Folksinger' Gorgeous flower, apricot colors. Almost five feet tall in MN. gets some mildew and BS.

'Freckles' Looks like a Hybrid Tea. Healthy. Tall. Good BS tolerance.

'Frontier Twirl' Neon orange. Not hardy. Little plant.

'Gentle Persuasion' Gorgeous. Healthy.

'Golden Unicorn' Quite healthy. Lots of hips. Healthy.

'Grace Note' Like an Austin rose. Stippled, full blooms.

'Habenera' Deep pink

'Hawkeye Belle' Very healthy

'Hermina' Small plant. Dainty red flowers with white reverse.

'Hi, Neighbor' Sickly in fall.

'Honeysweet' Maroon foliage. Very colorful. Needs fungicide.

'That's Incredible' Very colorful. Stippled flower.

'Iobelle' Small plant in MN.

'Joseph Lamb' Named after a jazz composer. Small plant to two feet. Flowers in clusters.

'Les Sjulin' Big, saucer_shaped flowers. Colorful. To three feet in MN.

'Malaguena' Hardy

'Maytime' Almost single flowers. Pink_yellow blend. Beautiful colors.

'Mountain Music' Apricot, mutable color. Small plant.

'Night Song' Not hardy in MN.

'Paloma Blanca' Very healthy. Dark green foliage.

'Pearlie Mae' Vigorous.

'Pipe Dreams' Similar to 'Les Sjulin'

'Polonaise' Red. Gets diseases in fall.

'Prairie Clogger' Disease_prone.

'Prairie Flower' Hardiest Buck. Very healthy. Dark foliage. Single flowers.

'Prairie Harvest' Does very well in MN. Tall. Healthy.

'Prairie Lass' Very healthy, Stippled flowers, Shaggy habit. Does best when it's cool.

'Prairie Princess' Long canes. Can climb

'Prairie Star' Ivory flowers with unusual scent. Unhealthy.

'Prairie Sunrise' Strong scent. Healthy, dark green foliage.

'Prairie Sunset' Reddish petals with yellow reverse. Not hardy, not healthy.

'Princess Verona' Little blooms

'Queen Bee' Climber. Not hardy in MN.

'Rural Rhythm' Strong scent

'Serendipity' Apricot, colorful stamens. Hardy in zone 4. Some BS. Floriferous.

'Sevilliana' Stippled. Three feet.

'Silver Shadows' Not hardy. Sister to 'Blue Skies.' Extremely fragrant. Silver petals.

'Spanish Rhapsody' Very mottled_stippled colors. perhaps one of the most colorful roses in Buck's collection.

'Square Dancer' Wants to climb. Very vigorous, very healthy. Short lasting blooms.

'Summer Wind' Colorful. Big hips. hardy. Dense, low_growing bush. Good replacement for 'Nearly Wild.'

'Virginia Reel' Small plant. Flowers have a cupped form.

'Wanderin' Wind' Gorgeous. Tall plant. Entirely hardy in a milder climate.

'Wild Ginger' Not for zone four.

'Winter Sunset' Apricot flower. Very healthy. Always survives winter. Free flowering.

 

 

 

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Date last edited: 01/21/10
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